7 Things You Can Do to Help Immigrant Families at the Border

Filed under Immigration

Families belong together in communities with access to support and resources, not imprisoned indefinitely. From rallying in the streets to supporting legal aid for children, here's how you can speak out against the government’s treatment of immigrant families.

We've witnessed the horrifying and heartbreaking pictures, stories, and sounds coming from the detention centers where immigrant children are being held. When our government embraces policies that imprison children and criminalize families, it is incumbent on all of us to speak out.

In the weeks since the administration implemented their "zero-tolerance" policy at our southern border, more than 2,000 immigrant children have been taken away from their families. This policy expands the shameful practice of family detention and further criminalizes immigrants who are seeking refuge. It also keeps children behind bars indefinitely.

We join our partners in choosing to act and have our voices heard. We hope you'll join us.

In Oakland, California, a supporter holds up a sign at a June 1 day of action against family separation.

  1. Join rallies and events to show your support.

    On June 30, thousands of people joined a mass mobilization at more than 700 events across the country. You can keep tabs on future rallies and other events at FamiliesBelongTogether.org.

  2. Call, email, and Tweet your Members of Congress.

    Encourage your network to urge their Members of Congress to use Congress’ oversight authority to stop forcibly separating and jailing families—and to vote down the two anti-immigrant bills moving through the House this week.

    The ACLU has a call tool specifically for Senators; the American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA) has a call tool that directs calls, tweets, Facebook posts, and emails to all Members of Congress. Herd on the Hill will hand-deliver letters to Congress starting June 19 and continuing “as long as it takes” on the issue of family separation at the border. Individuals can compose letters for delivery on the Herd on the Hill portal that will be printed and brought to the House and Senate.

  3. Raise awareness about this cruel policy.

    This issue isn't a political one, it's a moral one. Make your voice heard and share information—and particularly stories—that show the human side of this issue.

    Stories to share:

Under current policy, immigrant families are still susceptible to forced separation.

  1. Sign and circulate a petition to your network.

  2. If you're a lawyer, sign up to volunteer your services.

    We The Action is a digital platform that makes it easy for lawyers to find and volunteer for critical, impactful—and often urgent—legal needs posted by We The Action’s nonprofit partners. WTA currently has several projects available for lawyers who want to help parents and children who have been separated at the border. Many of these projects can be done remotely, with any bar license. Lawyers can sign up to access projects here and nonprofits who need lawyers can sign up here.

  3. Join and support organizations near the border.

    If you live near the southwestern border or are willing to travel, you can volunteer with local organizations. Check the Families Belong Together Guide on How to Help for more details.

The only way to ensure families are kept safe, together, is by ending the administration's cruel "zero-tolerance" policy.